Wildfire Tech PR Blog

‘Facebook at Work’: It might be time to change your Facebook photo

Posted by Alex Perryman on Dec 10, 2014

I’m going to confess something: I spend an unhealthy amount of time on Facebook.

Beyond my professional duties of helping to administer or contribute to various business pages, far too much of my life is lived in The Big Blue app.

Like many, I use Facebook to scream my ill-informed (and often quite political) views at friends who, being friends, will shrug and ignore me. No damage done. And, like many, I keep my personal and professional lives separate. ‘LinkedIn is for business, Facebook is for personal use’. Frankly I’d prefer my superiors aren’t subjected to my Malaga snaps.

Hence why I’ve tracked news of Facebook’s separate Facebook at Work project with interest. I feel like the idea of being able to run two completely separate streams has merit.

However, I’ve noticed a fairly worryingly trend occurring in Facebook.

Facebook seems to have started very aggressively recommending ‘people you may know’ that I am connected to through work.…

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Oreos, YouTube and transparency in social media marketing

Posted by Louise Andrews on Dec 08, 2014

OreoThe need for transparency when it comes to paid-for product promotion came to the fore recently, with the Advertising Standards Authority’s ruling that a video paid for by Oreos that featured YouTube stars broke advertising code.

The popular chocolate biscuit brand paid a host of YouTube stars to promote its product in videos.

Now there’s nothing fundamentally wrong with these vloggers receiving money for their brand endorsement efforts. The issue is that they must make it very clear to fans and viewers that they aren’t simply doing this out of their love for the product.

As The Guardian reports, Mondelēz, the parent company for the Oreo brand, said they weren’t intentionally trying to be misleading and each vlogger did state they were working with Oreo. But in the words of the ASA, the ads must be ‘obviously identifiable marketing communications’.  According to the ASA, they were not.

What does this landmark ruling mean for brands, marketers and their PR agencies?…

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P-P-P-P-PR a Penguin

Posted by Alex Warren on Dec 04, 2014

maxresdefaultWhen it comes to marketing, it takes a lot of guts to take on a brand like Coca Cola. For years, the soft drinks vendor has dominated Christmas advertising with its red trucks, animated polar bears, and suitably bloated Santa Claus. For the last few years however, a growing focus on improved storytelling has left Coca Cola’s advertising team standing out in the cold. Now, there’s a new player in town, and his name is Monty the Penguin.

For the last four years, John Lewis has dominated the Christmas airwaves with tales of friendship, family, and the “true” meaning of Christmas. This year was no exception, with the release of the retailer’s latest advertising mascot: Monty – the little penguin who just wanted to be loved.

Only one month after its launch the campaign is already pegged for multiple advertising awards, with Monty himself expected to go down in ad history alongside Alexander the Meerkat, and that grubby Yorkshire tyke from the Hovis adverts.…

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Five things I learnt at The Festival of Marketing 2014

Posted by Ian McKee on Nov 19, 2014

Festival of MarketingI made it over to East London for the Festival of Marketing last week. It was a triumphant event, brought to you by the people behind Econsultancy and Marketing Week, with the great and the good of the UK marketing industry under one roof (or was it several? I couldn’t tell in the labyrinth that is Tobacco Docks).

The overarching themes getting talked about most regularly were fairly predictable; customer experience, content and optimising marketing for cost efficiency. I did learn a few newer things though.

1. Marketing hasn’t changed

Sure, we have innumerably more digital tools, channels, access to new swathes of data, but at its core marketing remains the same. That was the argument put forward by Simon Carter of Fujitsu in his seminar on the changing face of B2B marketing.

The promise of marketing automation tools (for example) is more personalised communication. But what really happens is lazy marketers just adopt these tools for what they were doing before; throwing enough s**t at the wall to see what sticks.…

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Could Facebook increase productivity in the workplace?

Posted by Joe McNamara on Nov 18, 2014

FacebookThere’s a good deal of irony yet a certain romance about Facebook’s latest ‘secret’ project, which has recently been covered by the Financial Times, The Independent, The Daily Telegraph, Reuters and Mashable. That’s not the ironic bit – honest.

Facebook at Work is the social networking giant’s latest bid to grow its user base and squeeze every last second out of existing users. It would take on the form of a social enterprise network – designed to allow colleagues to collaborate in a fun, more intuitive way in the workplace than the incumbent mass of email office-based workers are subject to every day.

The irony I speak of is in the fact Facebook is actually banned from a fair few offices under the assumption that it decreases employee productivity. Last year, 1 in 5 employees from US companies claimed to be denied Facebook access at work. That seems like a pretty naff idea, and Facebook-sceptics will see this as a backdoor way of clawing back their 9-5 users.…

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